flowers

Central Ohio Home & Garden Show

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We’re so excited to be decorating not one, but TWO booths at the Central Ohio Home & Garden Show this week!  The booths we created are milestone birthdays, in honor of Columbus’ 200th Birthday on Feb 14th, that incorporate some of our favorite things around Central Ohio and Columbus’ history.

Our first booth is a 1st Birthday theme that was inspired by the Sell’s Circus which was based in Columbus in the earlier party of the 1900’s.  Elephants and the other circus animals were housed near 5th Ave & Olentangy River Road.  Also, the Sell’s circus owner owned the big beautiful house at Buttles & Dennison.

The second booth is a Sweet 16 theme that was inspired by the eclectic but beautiful parks all around Columbus.  We’re partial to Goodale Park in Victorian Village because that’s our neighborhood.  The cute, shabby chic table we designed could easily be transported to the Gazebo for an fun afternoon in the park!

Homegardenboothdetails

If you’re headed to the show, stop by booth # 1215 and 1203!  If you feel inclined, snap a picture or two!  If you can, share them on Facebook! We’d love to see them! (be sure to tag Bliss Wedding & Event Design so we know they’re there!)

xo
Kasey

Wedding Bouquets Freezeframed

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Freezeframe provides brides with award winning flower preservation so that the bouquet carried down the aisle will last far past the wedding day.


Image from Freezeframe catalog

The key to preserving your wedding day flowers is planning!
Freezeframe requests that you call and reserve your space 10 days prior to the wedding so that they will have time to send you the appropriate packaging. Flowers should then arrive within 72 hours of the event.

Freezeframe offers customers a wide variety of preservation options and displays that are sure to match any bride’s long lasting vision. Orders take about 10-14 weeks on average to be completed, but the end result lasts for years!

Back to Basics: Flowers

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Next on your planning to do list is to find a florist. We thought we’d share a few basic pieces of information that might help during your initial florist consultations or interviews. We always recommend having your planner accompany you to these meetings. Your planner can be a great resource in helping you convey the look and style you want to create to the florist as well as helping brainstorm with the florist in creative alternatives that fit your budget!


There are four main classes of flowers. Pull a little from each category with a little greenery and your bouquet can come together in a snap!


Line Flowers: have florets along a long stem usually form the outline of a large arrangement or a cascade in a bouquet (Cantury Bells, Forsythia, Lily of the Valley, Snapdragon, Sweet Pea).


Form Flowers: are distinctively shaped and used in the main focal area of an arrangement or bouquet (Alstroemeria, Bird of Paradise, Calla Lily, Freesia, Gardenias, Lily, Orchid, Hydrangea, Tulip).


Mass Flowers: are used as the bulk of an arrangement or bouquet (Gerbera, Lisianthus, Mums, Peony, Rose, Sunflower).

Filler Flowers: are used to fill voids (Caspia, Baby’s Breath, Heather, Spray mums, Spray roses).


Greenery: usually used to hide the “mechanics” such as foam or wire. Can also be used as filler for large arrangements.

This stem tied bouquet has cymbidium orchids, cala lilies, roses and dahlias


You can arrange your blooms in several different ways.

Cascade: a waterfall-like “spill” of blooms and greenery that’s anchored in a hand-held base.

Classic Hand-tied Bouquet: a dense bunch of blooms tied with floral wire. This style is most popular today.

Composite: handmade creation in which different flowers are wired together on a single stem, creating the illusion of one giant flower.

Nosegay: small, round cluster of flowers, all cut to a uniform length; usually made with one dominant flower or color. These are becoming increasingly more popular with the mothers of the bride (or groom).

Pomander: bloom-covered ball suspended from a ribbon.

This image shows a great use of pomander balls made of gerber dasies.
You could also use roses or mums to create the look!